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"I think the Australian film industry is a vital one, and always has been"  -Cate Blanchett
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0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  A HUNDRED YEARS, A MILLION MILES
We begin a provocative three part examination of the state of cinema after its first centenary by HUNTER CORDAIY; as he points out, cinema once created the market, with films like Blow Up (pictured), rather than merely pander to it.
  A HUNDRED YEARS, A MILLION MILES: PART 2
LEARNING IN THE DARK
By Hunter Cordaiy (pictured).
  A HUNDRED YEARS, A MILLION MILES: PART 3
The final essay on the impact of cinema in its century as an art form.(Sam Fuller,left) By Hunter Cordaiy
  A MATTER OF JUDGEMENT
The judgements of critics have been under fire recently, and the debate has important implications for how we report films, and even on the duty of critics and reviewers in the new climate of converging culture. By Hunter Cordaiy.
  A MATTER OF OPINION
Crass but descriptive, there is a saying I heard somewhere about opinions on movies: "like an asshole, everyone's got one." By Andrew L. Urban.
  A REAL FILM INDUSTRY NEEDS PRIVATE FINANCE
Industry practitioner and past film bureaucrat, Greg Smith, responds to Andrew L. Urban's ARTICLE about the Australian film industry - or rather it's absence - in this provocative letter.
  A SIMPLIFIED WORLD?
As we hit our 11th annual milestone, editor Andrew L. Urban reflects on how simple life is (or is made out to be) in today’s world of the movies; Kindness / Crushed Head / Burmese Soldier / Sniper Rifle / Arm Ripped Off … two stars?
  ADS AT THE CINEMA ? A BIG FAT RASPBERRY
  AUSTRALIAN BOX OFFICE 2004 – FORGET THE SIZE, FEEL THE WIDTH
With last week’s figures showing Australian films took just 1.3% of the total box office in 2004 still ringing in our ears, it’s time to stop being so simplistic, says Andrew L. Urban. We must look deeper to put the figures in context, and remember that the raison d’etre of taxpayer funding of films was never simply to count box office returns
  AUSTRALIAN FILM INDUSTRY - WHEN? PART 3
The debate we started three weeks ago about Australia's film industry continues this week (April 20, 2000) with this article, commissioned for and by The Bulletin, Australia's oldest stirrer-n-shaker news and current affairs weekly. ANDREW L. URBAN talks to Arts Minister Peter McGauran, among others, in an effort to clarify our communal objectives for spending over $100 million on film and tv production. Why do we do it and could we ever have a real industry?
  AUSTRALIAN FILM INDUSTRY? WHEN?
There is still no such thing as a real film industry here, argues ANDREW L. URBAN, although there probably could be. And there should be -but Australia first needs a debate on why and how we support filmmaking, so we can clear up the confusion that clogs the current, well meaning but unworkable policy, which is perhaps not expediting the growth of a real industry.
  AUSTRALIAN FILM INDUSTRY? WHEN? READERS RESPONSE
Australian films are boring - and the tough nut of distribution: readers respond to Andrew L. Urban's essay on the Australian film business (30/3/2000)
  AUSTRALIAN FILMMAKING - THE PERFECT STORM
Should audiences choose movies by their (Australian) nationality? Is culture enough to drive box office? Has the film industry inadvertently unleashed a virus in the past weeks, instead of shoring up support? Andrew L. Urban says the various elements of the film funding debate have collided into the perfect storm – and visibility has dropped to zero.
  AUSTRALIAN FILMMAKING - THE PERFECT STORM
Should audiences choose movies by their (Australian) nationality? Is culture enough to drive box office? Has the film industry inadvertently unleashed a virus in the past weeks, instead of shoring up support? Andrew L. Urban says the various elements of the film funding debate have collided into the perfect storm – and visibility has dropped to zero.
  AUSTRALIAN FILMMAKING: CHANGE OR PERISH SAYS BRIAN ROSEN
Brian Rosen, who as Chief Executive of the Australian Film Finance Corporation is arguably the most influential and powerful man in Australian filmmaking, is floating some radical ideas to change the culture and practice of subsidising film production. For one thing, he wants to change the business from a cottage industry into a real one. Andrew L. Urban looks into the coming revolution. (This article also published in The Bulletin with Newsweek, on sale July 7, 2004.)





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