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0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  EDITORIAL - 5/11/2009: THE DEBATE WE HAVE TO HAVE RE OZ FILMS & AUDIENCES: THE AFTERMATH. By Andrew L. Urban.
The ball has started rolling … the Metro Screen ‘Ozfilm’ Forum on October 22, 2009 which I had the pleasure of moderating, has launched public discussion on several key issues that have been unresolved in the Australian film industry; many of them for years. Veteran producers sigh with ennui when hearing the same old problems brought to the surface.
  EDITORIAL - 9/5/2013: GO BIG OR GO EXTINCT: THE HOLLYWOOD MANTRA
By Andrew L. Urban
  EDITORIAL – 16/9/2008: GREAT WEEK: TRUE STORIES, GREAT AUSSIE MOVIES (WHAT CRISIS?)
In a week rich with true stories, Man On Wire stands out, coincidentally retracing events that took place around the same time as Brenda Hean’s disappearance – the subject of an Australian doco also opening (see below). Man On Wire is the story of the famed French high wire artist Philippe Petit, who balanced his way across the rope above the Sydney Harbour Bridge one year (1973), and New York’s World Trade Centre the next.
  EDITORIAL – 20/11/2008: BETTER, BRAVER FILM IDEAS NEEDED
Incoming president of the Screen Producers Association of Australia, Tony Ginnane, started another bout of analysis of Australian filmmaking failures with his comments (which we publish in full) at the opening of producers’ annual conference on the Gold Coast last week. Just not good enough to put bums on seats, he said. The day after Ginnane’s speech, visiting American entrepreneur Chris Adams (due to move and make films here next year) narrowed it down to the writing (for feature films): mostly shocking, he said. We also publish his remarks, made in his interview with editor Andrew L. Urban.
  EDITORIAL – 23/5/2013: CAVALIA & THE ART OF INSPIRATION
Horses, acrobats, music and technology on a stage bigger than an IMAX theatre would not normally make it to this page in this zine. But then Cavalia is not a normal live show, and the reason I am writing about it is because it inspires, excites and satisfies … all things that good cinema does, too. All art does, too … not always.
  EDITORIAL – 27/11/2008: GOVERNMENT FUNDING POLICY RUINED BY TAXMAN?
After months of investigation the Australian Tax Office advised the Screen Producers Association of Australia last week that it would not make any changes to the timing of the acquittal requirements of the Producer Offset. This means that the production industry is still locked into the costs of interest payments on the loans to cashflow the offset until the year following the completion of the film or program. Is the ATO now ruining Government policy?
  EDITORIAL – 27/6/2013: SQUEAMISH ABOUT SEX, BLASÉ ABOUT VIOLENCE
By Andrew L. Urban

  EDITORIAL – 29/10/2009: THE DEBATE WE HAVE TO HAVE (OZ FILMS VS OZ AUDIENCES)
We are making more and more films – but fewer and fewer are getting to audiences via cinemas; the Australian share of the box office is as meagre as ever; young entrepreneur filmmakers with low budget films (under $1 million) are denied access to the 40% producer offset rebate; some of our stories are ‘more of the same’…. But there are some things the industry can do to effect change for the better, suggests Andrew L. Urban. (As long as it’s not afraid of change.)
  EDITORIAL – 3/10/2013: SAVING THE PLANET – ONE FILM AT A TIME
  EDITORIAL – 3/12/2009: TERRORISM FIT FOR COMEDY
By Andrew L. Urban.
It was with a burst of interest that I opened the press release announcing a ‘terrorism comedy’ being shot in Melbourne by the team that made The Jammed (2007), led by writer/director Dee McLachlan. Titled Eliminated, the film takes the reality TV format as its structure, with a panel of judges drawn from the ranks of guerrillas to decide which contestant will be crowned Master Terrorist.
  EDITORIAL – 6/6/2013: A GREAT DISSERVICE TO THE GREAT GATSBY
  EDITORIAL – 8/10/2009: THE CRUSHING OF AUSTRALIAN FILM
The traditional, ‘old world’ distribution system is more a hindrance than help for most Australian films; it’s not enough to have our filmmakers make films, we have to be able to see them – and maybe not just in cinemas, argues Andrew L. Urban, but anywhere in the country or the world - with a broadband connection.
  EDITORIAL – 8/12/2011: CENSORSHIP IS POWER – TRANSPARENCY REQUIRED
By Andrew L. Urban

  EDITORIAL 19/8/2010: COALITION’S $60 MILLION GAME CHANGER
  EDITORIAL 20/12/2012: USE-BY DATE IS HERE FOR MOVIE AWARDS
As the movie award season gets under way, Andrew L. Urban argues that it’s time for a major overhaul.
  EDITORIAL- 10/1/2013: BASED ON A TRUE STORY
By Andrew L. Urban.

  EDITORIAL- 14/4/2011: FOUR CORNERS CROSS EYED ON NBN
By Andrew L. Urban

  EDITORIAL- 17/3/2011: WHAT MAKES IT AUSTRALIAN –THE CONTENT OR THE MAKER?
By Andrew L. Urban
  EDITORIAL- 2/5/2013: THE LESSONS OF SALEM
By Andrew L. Urban
  EDITORIAL- 21/5/2009: FILM FESTIVAL POSTERS SUCK
What is it about the graphic designers hired by film festivals that makes them create – universally and continuously – such woeful designs, year after year? From the majors like Cannes, to the newest like Dungog, festivals create new posters each year, and almost without exception they are awful, inaccessible, meaningless, wanky or plain silly. By Andrew L. Urban.
  EDITORIAL- 22/7/2010: INDIES ARE AS INDIES DO
One of America’s most daring indie filmmakers, David Lynch, has donated a unique self portrait (see image) to the production team of a new doco about his life, limited edition copies of which will be sent to fans in return for a donation of $50 towards the film’s budget. (Either it’s a very low budget film or it won’t be a very limited edition ...) - Andrew L. Urban
  EDITORIAL- 25/8/2011: AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY – AT LAST
By Andrew L. Urban.
  EDITORIAL- 28/5/2009: FILM FESTIVAL POSTERS SUCK – PART 2
Last week’s editorial critical of film festival poster designs has drawn a few responses: the first one came from the New Zealand International Film Festival, who sent us a copy of their 2009 poster, which they reckon is pretty good. So do we ... but there are plenty out there which are not pretty, or good. Here are a few more.
  EDITORIAL- 28/6/2012: COOL IT – A FILM GIVEN THE COLD SHOULDER
It was to have been released on June 28 in cinemas around Australia, but cinemas around Australia didn’t want to book it – because it was made in 2010, was one reason given to the distributor (Umbrella Entertainment). Cool It is a film version of Bjorn Lomborg’s coherent and rational arguments urging the world to cool it – the heated debate about climate change. It is just as relevant today as it was in 2010 – maybe more so, argues Andrew L. Urban.
  EDITORIAL- 30/4/2009: PIRACY IS STILL THEFT
With Somalian pirates going gangbusters on the gangplanks of modern cargo ships and Swedish Pirate Bay movie and music site found guilty of online piracy all crowding the news, it’s a little unnerving to think that the romanticised notion of buccaneering pirates is being used to bolster the image of thieves. Piracy is theft, even on the internet, I maintain. By Andrew L. Urban.
  EDITORIAL- 30/9/2010: NBN – THE SOVIET MODEL WON’T HELP US - OR OUR FILMMAKERS
By Andrew L. Urban (with comment by Simon Britton)
  EDITORIAL- 9/2/2012: FILM CRITICS & AUSTRALIAN FILMS
  EDITORIAL: 18/9/2008 - Movies & morals after Sunday mass
From the Editor, Andrew L. Urban:
Movies often explore moral, psychological and social issues of various kinds, but we were surprised this week to get a request from the Assumption Catholic Church in Chicago to let their webmaster link to some of our movie reviews. Happy to consent but curious as to how a church would use movie reviews, we soon discovered that it is about to launch a series of seven Mass & A Movie events, one Sunday a month from October 2008 to April 2009.
  END OF DAZE
The (next) looming crisis for Australia’s film and TV industry is self evident - except to those in the business itself who are still in denial. Audiences are no longer a mass, but a million-fold audience of just one, and taking control of the consumption of content, argues Creed O’Hanlon.





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