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 The World of Film in Australia - on the Internet Updated Tuesday, December 5, 2017 

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ABAGNALE, FRANK: CATCH ME IF YOU CAN ABAGNALE, FRANK: CATCH ME IF YOU CAN
He conned his way around the world, posing as a pilot while still in his teens, and cashing $2.5 million in dud cheques; but it wasn’t for the money, the real Frank Abagnale from Steven Spielberg’s Catch Me If You Can, tells Keith Lofthouse.
  ABBESS, SHANE – GABRIEL
Debuting filmmaker Shane Abbess was determined to make an Australian gothic action movie, and the lack of money didn’t deter him. Now the film has been picked up for worldwide distribution by Sony – a deal he could have only dreamt of when his own movie ‘angel’ first came to rescue. Andrew L. Urban visited the set during production of Gabriel and talked to Abbess.
  ABRAMS, J.J. - SUPER 8
It was a love of both magic and movies – and how the two could be combined – that drew J.J. Abrams to make films, especially his latest, Super 8, he tells Andrew L. Urban.
  ADAMSON, ANDREW - THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: PRINCE CASPIAN
You need challenges to grow, and drama needs comedy – says director Andrew Adamson, who needs rest, as he explains in the Q & A.
AFFLECK, BEN: PEARL HARBOR AFFLECK, BEN: PEARL HARBOR
Ben Affleck goes through the hell of war and learns to respect history in Pearl Harbour. Jenny Cooney Carrillo reports.
  ALDA, ALAN - TOWER HEIST
In Tower Heist, Alan Alda plays Arthur Shaw, the financial highflyer whose greedy scheme costs lots of little people their life savings – a total contrast to Alda the man. Alda talks about the film as it is released in Australia on DVD.
ALDISS, BRIAN: A.I: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ALDISS, BRIAN: A.I: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
After waiting more than 20 years to have his story turned into a movie, and parting company with Stanley Kubrick, author Brian Aldiss didn’t get invited to a screening of AI, but he’s too busy writing to care much, he explains to Jeff Goldsmith.
ALLEN WOODY, Celebrity ALLEN WOODY, Celebrity
SANDRA BORDIGONI talks to Woody Allen about his latest film, Celebrity, which he shot in black and white "because it’s beautiful" – and perhaps because it reminds him of his favourite European films. The film also asks what’s gone wrong with US culture?
ALLEN, JOAN: THE CONTENDER ALLEN, JOAN: THE CONTENDER
In The Contender, she plays a US Senator nominated for Vice President, but in life Joan Allen is a very private, non-political person with a 6 year old daughter. And an Oscar nomination. Jenny Cooney Carrillo asks Allen about her life and career.
ALLEN, KEVIN : TWIN TOWN ALLEN, KEVIN : TWIN TOWN
Twin Town, the first feature by Welsh director Kevin Allen has made an impact in Britain and the US, and will do so again in Australia. PAUL FISCHER met the film's writer/director earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival.
ALLEN, WOODY: Sweet and Lowdown ALLEN, WOODY: Sweet and Lowdown
The only thing standing between me and greatness is me," WOODY ALLEN tells Jenny Cooney Carrillo in this interview about his latest film, Sweet and Lowdown, about Emmett Ray, who, like so many people in life, is capable of such great beauty but is so insensitive and self-involved.
ALTMAN, ROBERT: Cookie's Fortune ALTMAN, ROBERT: Cookie's Fortune
Now aged 74, Altman is still bucking the system, but his latest films, such as Cookie's Fortune, represents a softer, gentler Altman, or does it? PAUL FISCHER spoke to one of America's foremost filmmakers.
ALTMAN, ROBERT: NASHVILLE 25TH ALTMAN, ROBERT: NASHVILLE 25TH
Andrew L. Urban telephones Robert Altman to talk about Nashville, the film that 25 years ago changed Altman's life, but on reflection, Altman reckons it's a film that just 'occurred'.
  ANAYA, ELENA – THE SKIN I LIVE IN
She had to play a survivor like never before, Elena Anaya tells Andrew L. Urban.
  ANDERSON, GILLIAN & PARKER, OLIVER - JOHNNY ENGLISH REBORN
For a change, Gillian Anderson uses some comedy ‘muscles’ she tells Andrew L. Urban, while director Oliver Parker explains why he had to be strict with the cast to make sure they played it straight – except of course Rowan Atkinson.
ANDERSON, PAUL THOMAS: MAGNOLIA ANDERSON, PAUL THOMAS: MAGNOLIA
Eating fruit, talking turkey, sick to death of frogs … Paul Thomas Anderson is not your average publicity-speaking filmmaker, as DAVID EDWARDS discovers in this interview in a Berlin hotel. Magnolia, he says, is long for a reason. (He also clarifies what Tom Cruise had in his underwear.)
  ANDRIKIDIS, PETER – ALEX & EVE
The fear of new and unknown is the driving force behind the Greek v Lebanese culture clash explored in Alex and Eve, multi-award winning (Greek descendant) director Peter Andrikidis tells Andrew L. Urban.
ANISTON, JENNIFER: THE GOOD GIRL ANISTON, JENNIFER: THE GOOD GIRL
In the independent film, The Good Girl, Jennifer Aniston makes a dramatic transformation from her popular Friends character of Rachel to playing a bored wife in a small town whose affair with a younger man throws her life into chaos. And she welcomed an unglamorous role for a change, she tells Jenny Cooney Carrillo.
ANSARA, ALICE; LA SPAGNOLA ANSARA, ALICE; LA SPAGNOLA
One day in a pizza shop, the young star of La Spagnola, Alice Ansara had a private moment that gave her the motivation to be an actress, she tells Andrew L. Urban
APTED MICHAEL: 42UP APTED MICHAEL: 42UP
One can't imagine two more different films than the documentary 42 Up and the new James Bond adventure, The World is Not Enough, yet they're both helmed by the same director, Michael Apted, one of Britain's most respected filmmakers. Why would the some time documentarian want to spend over a year on 007? From his London office, Apted spoke to PAUL FISCHER.
ARMSTRONG, GILLIAN - CHARLOTTE GRAY ARMSTRONG, GILLIAN – CHARLOTTE GRAY
Gillian Armstrong tells Andrew L. Urban why there’s no French spoken in Charlotte Gray, despite her filmmaking instincts, and why English actors play French roles in a film mostly set in France.
  ARMSTRONG, GILLIAN – OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 2007
One of the iconic figures of Australia’s film renaissance in the 1970, Gillian Armstrong, is this month honoured by her peers with the Outstanding Achievement Award; the filmmaking process has many highlights for her, she tells Andrew L. Urban.
ARONOFSKY DARREN: Pi ARONOFSKY DARREN: Pi
It’s all Greek to you and me – and even to its maker: Pi is Darren Aronofsky’s gripping, low budget psycho-thriller with a sci fi sensibility, about a man addicted to solving the riddle of pi. ANDREW L. URBAN phoned Aronofsky at his New York home for a chat about the film.
ARONOFSKY, DARREN: REQUIEM FOR A DREAM ARONOFSKY, DARREN: REQUIEM FOR A DREAM
Alistair Harkness calls Darren Aronofsky a cinematic pugilist after seeing the filmmaker’s latest film, Requiem For A Dream, at the London Film Festival, where the director says it’s more about the addiction to the image of a better life than about drugs.
  ASTBURY, PETA – THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO
On Wednesday (Oct 28, 2009) Peta Astbury was recovering from food poisoning (“I’m not buying take away quiche for a while…”) and packing for the morning flight to Sydney, where she jumped on the back of Tony Hill’s Harley in a bridal dress to be part of the 29-bikie parade around town (on Oct. 29) to promote The Marriage of Figaro, her (and Hill’s) debut feature, which has finally reached metro cinemas. Andrew L. Urban talks to Peta Astbury.
ATKINSON, ROWAN: Bean ATKINSON, ROWAN: Bean
As the inimitable Mr Bean, Rowan Atkinson has stumbled and bumbled into the minds and hearts of millions of devotees, so inevitably, the selfish master of TV mayhem moves to the movies. PAUL FISCHER sat down for an audience with someone he regards as one of the world's few comic geniuses.
  ATTENBOROUGH, SIR DAVID - FLYING MONSTERS
Sir David Attenborough (85) took to the air in a glider next to the CGI of a flying monster from 71 million years ago, so we could see just how big these animals were, he tells Andrew L. Urban. It would have been a hang glider, but the insurers wouldn’t let him.
  AUF DER HEIDE, JONATHAN & REDDING, OSCAR - VAN DIEMEN'S LAND
Writer/director Johnathan Auf Der Heide wants to portray the story of convict cannibal Alexander Pearce with honesty and authenticity, as he explains in this statement about his first feature, Van Diemen’s Land. You can listen to the conversation between Jonathan, the film’s star Oscar Redding, and Andrew L. Urban,
  AVATI, PUPI: A HEART ELSEWHERE
Using your own life as material for your films is powerful, but it can also be embarrassing, as Pupi Avati explains to Andrew L. Urban during his Sydney visit to launch the Italian Film Festival with his new award winning film, A Heart Elsewhere.
  AYRES, TONY – THE HOME SONG STORIES
Ghosts from the past turn up as real people when filmmaker Tony Ayres reveals his troubled childhood years and his mother’s complicated life in The Home Song Stories, which often disobeys cinematic conventions, he tells Andrew L. Urban.





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