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"Part of the way through when we were shooting in Morocco, the rhino gets the chop and we moved to tigers instead. "  -Russell Crowe, on making Gladiator
 The World of Film in Australia - on the Internet Updated Thursday, November 16, 2017 

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PACINO, AL : The Insider PACINO, AL : The Insider
In The Insider, Al Pacino plays Lowell Bergman investigative reporter and segment producer for 60 Minutes, working on a story that brings him into contact with Jeffrey Wigand, tobacco 'insider': his journalistic instincts recognise there is a potent secret behind Wigand's silence. Pacino talks to our European correspondent JORN ROSSING JENSEN.
PALTROW,  GWYNETH: Great Expectations PALTROW, GWYNETH: Great Expectations
Gwyneth Paltrow is one of the most sought after actresses in Hollywood, but don't expect her to play by the Hollywood rules - when talking about one of her latest films, the critically maligned Great Expectations, she's fairly frank and honest, as Paul Fischer discovered when he met the actress at this year's Sundance Film Festival.
PANTOLIANO, JOE : US Marshals PANTOLIANO, JOE : US Marshals
It's hard to imagine that Joe Pantoliano has been a working actor for over 20 years. Currently appearing in US Marshals, and working in Sydney on Matrix, he spoke to PAUL FISCHER.
  PARK, NICK – WALLACE & GROMIT THE CURSE OF THE WERE RABBIT
Animator Nick Park admits to Andrew L. Urban that world famous cheese lover, Wallace, has had dental work done for his debut on the feature film, Wallace & Gromit The Curse of the Were Rabbit. But his character and his world remain loveably familiar. (See end of story for The Amazing Facts About W&G)
  PARKER, DAVID: Diana & Me
Making a film, even a romantic comedy like Diana and Me, can have its horrific moments, as director David Parker reveals to ANDREW L. URBAN.
PARKER, MOLLY : Kissed PARKER, MOLLY : Kissed
It’s not easy making a film about necrophilia, or playing a young woman who sexually desires the dead, but Canadian actress Molly Parker’s career was literally born out of doing Kissed, and she hasn’t looked back since. In her only Australian interview, she tells PAUL FISCHER how solitary it felt sometimes.
  PEARCE, GUY – THE PROPOSITION
Excited by working on The Proposition, a film where character was king, all films should be this satisfying to make, Guy Pearce tells Andrew L. Urban.
PEARCE, GUY: LA Confidential PEARCE, GUY: LA Confidential
In this interview at last month's Toronto Film Festival where LA Confidential had its first North American screening, the actor spoke candidly to PAUL FISCHER about acting, Hollywood and playing a cop in the most anticipated film of the year. (Photo: Judy Kopperman)
PEARCE, GUY: MEMENTO PEARCE, GUY: MEMENTO
What to do? Music or musing? Nothing or acting? As his fame grows and the films get bigger, Guy Pearce is in a bit of a quandary, he admits to Jenny Cooney Carrillo, while discussing his starring role in Memento.
PEARCE, GUY: THE HARD WORD PEARCE, GUY: THE HARD WORD
With The Hard Word, it was the tone of the script that rang his bell, Guy Pearce, tells Andrew L. Urban. Happily, he says, the tone was retained to the finished film. But now it’s time for a breather.
  PEGG, SIMON & FROST, NICK - PAUL
They’re actors not comedians, say Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, and comedy should be taken more seriously, they tell Andrew L. Urban.
  PEGG, SIMON - THE WORLD'S END
Unlike Gary King, his depressed, almost suicidal character in his latest film, The World’s End, Simon Pegg is very happy to be a home-dwelling father and husband and a casual gardener.
PERKINS, RACHEL: ONE NIGHT THE MOON PERKINS, RACHEL: ONE NIGHT THE MOON
Rachel Perkins leads a creative team of filmmakers to tell a story in music (21 tracks) and pictures (57 minutes) that stretches them all, bringing with it lessons in harmony and filmmaking, she tells Andrew L. Urban.
PERKINS, RACHEL: Radiance PERKINS, RACHEL: Radiance
Three sisters - an opera singer, a nurse and a party girl - return home for their mother’s funeral, which nobody else attends, in a story that spans 24 hours and rattles a number of skeletons; this debut feature for Rachel Perkins, has already gathered a following.  She talks to DAVID EDWARDS.
  PETTY, LORI – THE POKER HOUSE
In her autobiographical movie, The Poker House, Lori Petty portrays her mother (played by Selma Blair) as an abhorrent, cocaine snorting, booze addled prostitute; that was 30 years ago. But the last time she saw her mum was on the Memorial Day weekend in 2009, when she visited her and her sisters for massages, pedicures, manicures and facials. And ironically her mum’s only complaint about the film is that Selma Blair smokes. “I didn’t smoke!” she growls. Lori Petty provides more surprises in this interview with Andrew L. Urban.
PFEIFFER, MICHELLE: WHAT LIES BENEATH PFEIFFER, MICHELLE: WHAT LIES BENEATH
In What Lies Beneath, opposite Harrison Ford, Michelle Pfeiffer finally gets to star in a scary movie – one of her favourite genres – she tells JENNY COONEY CARRILLO. But she also confesses not to be as selfless as her character, when it comes to betrayal.
  PHILLIPS, NATHAN – UNDER THE RADAR
Nathan Phillips gets Andrew L. Urban incensed at the start, as the young actor reveals what makes him tick, why he loves Wolf Creek and how he got Under The Radar.
PHILLIPS, NATHAN: TAKE AWAY PHILLIPS, NATHAN: TAKE AWAY
After starring in Australian Rules last year, Nathan Phillips has made an American fantasy film in China, a drama about the rave scene, a surfing movie and the Australian comedy Take Away. Here is a young actor who has a roadmap planned for the future. And acting isn’t the only road on the map, he tells Louise Keller.
PISTONE,  JOE : Donnie Brasco PISTONE, JOE : Donnie Brasco

Paul Fischer meets Joe Pistone, the man who lived a Mob-busting lie as Donnie Brasco.

PITT,  BRAD: Seven Years in Tibet PITT, BRAD: Seven Years in Tibet
He’s Hollywood’s Golden Boy, a star up there with the best of them. In his latest film, Seven Years in Tibet, Pitt delivers his most challenging and risky performance to date, but the actor doesn’t see it that way. Paul Fischer spoke to him at the recent Toronto Film Festival.
PITT, BRAD (TROY) PITT, BRAD (TROY)
  PITT, BRAD - TROY
Brad Pitt wanted to test himself as an actor – and as a man nearing 40 – as he took on the role of Achilles in Troy, his first ever Hollywood epic, and a film with a crisis of conscience at its heart. Jenny Cooney Carrillo reports.
  PIXAR'S SHORT PEOPLE: ANDREW JIMENEZ & OSNAT SHURER
The three golden rules that drive Pixar filmmaking are: Story, Story, Story. That and a preparedness to ‘kill your babies’ – to ditch ideas if they don’t work out, as Pixar short makers Andrew Jimenez and Osnat Shurer tell Andrew L. Urban.
POLLACK SYDNEY: Random Hearts POLLACK SYDNEY: Random Hearts
Sydney Pollack talks to ANDREW L. URBAN about how Jaws changed Hollywood forever, the biggest challenge in making Random Hearts, 'art' or something of lasting value; and a Sydney barbie (cue).
POLLACK, SYDNEY: IN THE AFTERMATH POLLACK, SYDNEY: IN THE AFTERMATH
American filmmakers won’t be making any worthwhile movies about the catastrophic terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 for some years, perhaps a decade, says respected producer, director and actor Sydney Pollack. "We need to digest it…look what happened after Vietnam. We didn’t get a decent film from Vietnam for 10 years," he tells Andrew L. Urban.
POLSON JOHN: Siam Sunset POLSON JOHN: Siam Sunset
The most successful film at Cannes this year (1999) was Siam Sunset, with its first sale to France setting a record. It is opening in Australia (Sept. 9, 1999) and its director, John Polson, reveals to Andrew L. Urban how the movie 'pursued' him.
  POLSON, JOHN: HIDE AND SEEK
A phone call got him the gig, but another phone call could have lost it for him, John Polson tells Andrew L. Urban, recalling a foot-in-mouth moment with Robert DeNiro, star of Polson’s second Hollywood thriller, Hide And Seek.
POLSON, JOHN: MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 2 POLSON, JOHN: MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 2
Actor and Tropfest founder John Polson was in the bathroom of his Los Angeles hotel when ANDREW L. URBAN rang him after the Hollywood premiere of MI:2*, in which Polson co-stars; but things aren't going down the toilet, he says optimistically, as long as Australian politicians don't confuse foreign productions for Australian filmmaking.
POLSON, JOHN: SWIMFAN POLSON, JOHN: SWIMFAN
Swimfan, a teen thriller about a college swimming champion’s dangerous one night stand, was dead in the water. Not a single US studio wanted to finance it, and director John Polson didn’t want to direct it. At first. But he was soon having lunch with his producer and telling him to bite the bullet. The film opened at No. 1 in the US last month. Polson tells Andrew L. Urban what happened in between.
PORTER, SUSIE : WELCOME TO WOOP WOOP PORTER, SUSIE : WELCOME TO WOOP WOOP
Since her graduation from drama school nearly three years ago, actress Susie Porter has appeared in half a dozen films. But nothing will prepare movie audiences for the outrageous character she plays in the most politically incorrect Australian film of the year, Welcome to Woop Woop. She spoke to PAUL FISCHER.
PORTER, SUZIE: Feeling Sexy PORTER, SUZIE: Feeling Sexy
Shortly after Feeling Sexy opens in Australia, its star, Suzie Porter, begins filming her next film, Better Than Sex: but she will happily work in films without 'sex' in the title, she tells ANDREW L. URBAN, as long as she is taken seriously.
POTTER, MONICA: The Very Thought of You POTTER, MONICA: The Very Thought of You
A pyjama-clad Monica Potter fields the inevitable question from ANDREW L. URBAN ….and just puts another slurp of castor oil on her eyebrows.
POTTER, SALLY : The Tango Lesson POTTER, SALLY : The Tango Lesson
Exploring her own heart and soul, Sally Potter has made a personal film which explores how boundaries become bonds between artists in different disciplines. Potter talks to ANDREW L. URBAN
  PRECIOUS - BEHIND THE SCENES
Stars Gabby Sidibe and Mariah Carey, and director Lee Daniels talk about the making of Precious, one of the most remarkable films of 2009, now out on DVD; Sidibe reveals she told Daniels things about the character he hadn’t considered and Daniels reveals how he stalked author Sapphire for 10 years in pursuit of the movie rights.
  PRESTON, GAYLENE: PERFECT STRANGERS
Those romantic fantasies of Mr Right whisking the beautiful Princess to a lush and exotic safe haven are …. Dangerous! says Gaylene Preston, whose first self-authored feature film, Perfect Strangers, is the perfect antidote to romance, as she explains to Andrew L. Urban.
  PRIOR, SUSAN – A COLD SUMMER
They asked her to write for the film, but Susan Prior boldly suggested she take a role in A Cold Summer as well; hardly surprising for someone who was a born performer, as Andrew L. Urban discovers.
PRYCE, JONATHAN: Tomorrow Never Dies PRYCE, JONATHAN: Tomorrow Never Dies
British actor Jonathan Pryce may well be the most classically trained actor to play a villain in the James Bond franchise. He's also the most diverse. PAUL FISCHER spoke to him at the Toronto Film Festival.
  PSIHOYOS, LOUIE – THE COVE
Not only are Japanese fishermen slaughtering tens of thousands of dolphins each year, their meat, made toxic by extreme levels of mercury, is sold to the Japanese population (as whale meat) unaware of the risks, as director of The Cove, Louie Psihoyos, explains to Andrew L. Urban.
PUNCH MCGREGOR, ANGELA: Terra Nova PUNCH MCGREGOR, ANGELA: Terra Nova
After her award nominated role as Margie in Terra Nova, Angela Punch McGregor is taking a dramatic turn in her life, as she tells ANDREW L. URBAN. (Pic, Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith)
  PUTTNAM, LORD DAVID
The only Brit ever to head up a Hollywood studio, award winning producer extraordinaire Lord David Puttnam, exudes quiet authority, wit and intelligence as he delivers two keynote speeches to the film industry - one in Sydney (November 19, 2010) at the screen producers conference, and one on the Gold Coast as President of the International Jury at the Asia Pacific Screen Awards (December 2, 2010). Face to face, Lord Puttnam is even more generous with pointers for Australia’s film industry, as Andrew L. Urban discovers.





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