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AACTA AWARDS 2012 (PART 2) – WINNERS

RED DOG TOP DOG
Red Dog was top dog at the inaugural AACTA Awards. In all, eight feature film and 12 TV awards were presented at Sydney’s Opera House (Jan 31, 2012) in the second round of Australian screen awards, broadcast (later in the evening) on the Nine Network.

The first tranche of awards, for shorts, documentaries, sound, music, editing, production design, visual effects and cinematography) were handed out at a luncheon on January 15. A third section, the International Awards, were presented by a jet-setting Geoffrey Rush on Jan. 27 in Los Angeles (see below).

"to staple some Hollywood glamour"

The introduction of the International Awards is a clever device to staple some Hollywood glamour onto the AACTAs by taking the awards to them – in their home town, avoiding the problem of getting them to come here. This will have pleased Nine, who could use some of the glitter to rub onto the local show, with Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman and the stars of The Artist (Best International Film) being seen in the company of Russell Crowe and Geoffrey Rush. Short clips of the glam were cut into the Sydney Opera House presentation.

The film awards were somewhat of a surprise: Daniel Nettheim’s The Hunter had received nominations in 14 categories, including Best Film, direction, adapted screenplay and music; it won none. The Eye of The Storm had 12; it won one. Snowtown had 10, won 4. Red Dog had eight, won one. Oranges and Sunshine had 7 and Mad Bastards had 5 – neither won any. Griff the Invisible had one – and won it.

The presentation itself would have flowed had it not stopped and gone flat for the commercial breaks – especially as they weren’t really commercial breaks but holding spots, since the event was not televised live. These recurring flat spots aside, the production was otherwise a standard copy of the Oscars or Golden Globes – without the high profile or amusing MC. 

"A Few Best Men director Stephan Elliott... gave an outrageous speech"

The task of entertaining the live audience was left to A Few Best Men director Stephan Elliott, who gave an outrageous speech in which he a) came out as gay, b) gave Melbourne critic Jim Schembri a public walloping for what he called the ‘poison’ in his negative review of the film (while mentioning David & Margaret and Urban Cinefile’s Louise Keller as the few critics who ‘got’ the film as a piece of lighthearted fun. This was all said it in the context of the film’s opening weekend immediately prior to the Awards, when it took almost $2 million – more than Red Dog took in its opening weekend.) Elliott was edited out of the broadcast.

Other entertainment was patchy: it was a questionable decision to have a parody of songs like The Teddy Bear’s Picnic as the song to accompany clips of Best Film nominee The Hunter, for example. The moods of film and song clashed and it seemed a totally insensitive idea. But some of these worked, especially the Pigram Brothers playing live to Mad Bastards, for which they wrote the music.

Olivia Newton John opened the show with a troupe of dancers who made their way from the red carpet to the stage and created a nice buzz. The after party was held at the Hyde Park Barracks.

The audience at the Opera House – some of whom paid real money for tickets – were rather shortchanged by the poor quality sound and the dulling effects of the constant breaks. But the debate about how the AACTAs should develop and improve has only just started.

FEATURE FILM
SAMSUNG AACTA AWARD FOR BEST FILM
• RED DOG. Nelson Woss, Julie Ryan.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTION
• Snowtown. Justin Kurzel.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
• Griff The Invisible. Leon Ford.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
• Snowtown. Shaun Grant.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTOR
• Daniel Henshall. Snowtown.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS

• Judy Davis. The Eye Of The Storm.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
• Hugo Weaving. Oranges And Sunshine.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
• Louise Harris. Snowtown.

AACTA OTHER WINNERS

TELEVISION 
SWITCHED ON AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION PROGRAM
• Packed To The Rafters. Seven Network

SWITCHED ON AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE IN A TELEVISION DRAMA
• Asher Keddie. Paper Giants: The Birth Of Cleo. ABC1

WINNERS BY PRODUCTION
TELEVISION 
The Slap ‐ 5 Awards 
• AACTA Award for Best Telefeature, Mini Series or Short Run Series 
• AACTA Award for Best Direction in Television ‐ Episode 3 ‘Harry’ 
• AACTA Award for Best Screenplay in Television ‐ Episode 3 ‘Harry’ 
• AACTA Award for Best Lead Actor in a Television Drama ‐ Alex Dimitriades 
• AACTA Award for Best Guest or Supporting Actress in a Television Drama ‐ Diana Glenn 
‐ Episode 3 ‘Harry’ 

Cloudstreet ‐ 1 Award 
• AACTA Award for Best Young Actor ‐ Lara Robinson ‐ Part 1 

East West 101, Season 3 ‐ The Heroes' Journey ‐ 1 Award 
• AACTA Award for Best Television Drama Series 

The Gruen Transfer, Series 4 ‐ 1 Award 
• AACTA Award for Best Light Entertainment Television Series 

Killing Time, ‐ Episode 2 ‐ 1 Award 
• AACTA Award for Best Guest or Supporting Actor in a Television Drama ‐ Richard Cawthorne 

Packed To The Rafters ‐ 1 Awar
• Switched On Audience Choice Award for Best Television Program 

Paper Giants: The Birth of Cleo ‐ 1 Award 
• Switched On Audience Choice Award for Best Performance in a Television Drama ‐ Asher Keddie 

Sisters Of War 1 Award 
• AACTA Award for Best Lead Actress in a Television Drama ‐ Sarah Snook 


INTERNATIONAL AWARDS:
AACTA flew Geoffrey Rush from his Australian of the Year ceremony in Canberra on January 26 to the Los Angeles presentation on January 27 of the five inaugural International AACTA Awards, “determined by a jury of eminent Australian screen practitioners from a cross-section of crafts, and with a wealth of local and international experience.” (AACTA does not disclose their identities.)

“By announcing and presenting our first ever AACTA International Awards in Los Angeles in January, we have established the AACTA Awards as part of the global screen awards conversation, drawing greater recognition for our Awards, our talented award recipients, and the Australian screen industry," said AFI | AACTA CEO, Damian Trewhella.

The Artist was the big winner: Best Film for producer Thomas Langmann, and Best Direction for French director Michel Hazanavicius; Jean Dujardin, won Best Actor for his performance as George Valentin, a star of the silent film era, struggling to adjust to the arrival of the ‘talkies’. Dujardin was in attendance at the Ceremony, with Russell Crowe presenting the Best Actor Award.

Meryl Streep also attended the Ceremony, to receive the award for Best Actress for her role in The Iron Lady, presented to her by Nicole Kidman.

The award for Best Screenplay proved competitive, with two joint winners announced after jury voting was tied in this category. The two winners were the adapted screenplay, The Ides of March for George Clooney, Grant Heslov and Beau Willimon, and the original screenplay Margin Call for first time writer and director J.C. Chandor.

AACTA INTERNATIONAL AWARDS
AACTA International Award for Best Screenplay (Joint Winners)
• The Ides Of March. George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Beau Willimon
• Margin Call. J.C. Chandor

AACTA International Award for Best Direction
• The Artist. Michel Hazanavicius

AACTA International Award for Best Actor
• Jean Dujardin, The Artist

AACTA International Award for Best Actress
• Meryl Streep. The Iron Lady

AACTA International Award for Best Film

• The Artist. Thomas Langmann


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Red Dog

AACTA WINNERS - OTHER CATEGORIES


Daniel Henshall - Snowtown


Griff the Invisible


Judy Davis - The Eye of the Storm


Hugo Weaving - Oranges and Sunshine


Louise Harris - Snowtown

INTERNATIONAL AWARDS

The Artist


Meryl Street - The Iron Lady







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